• Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
  • Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946

Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946 - To date 4 pieces seems to exist

Brand:Tudor
Model:Oyster Automatic
Year:1946
Material:Stainless steel
Size - diameter excluding winding crown:34mm
Size - length including lugs:42mm
Condition:Very good
Price:$2,975

"Weird Stuff Happens"
Rolex Tudor Oyster with 'Bumper Movement' - 1946
To date 4 pieces seems to exist

Reference “The best of time Rolex Wristwatches” – James Dowling – A Schiffer Book for Collectors. Page 337.

Everyone knows that Rolex never produced self winding watches with anything other than 360 degree rotors.

Tudor Oyster Automatic with Bumper Movement in stainless steel. Cream dial with Arabic numbers and shock resisting. In the back of the case comes the number 41582 - 951 – 46. On the crown comes “Rolex Oyster with the Swiss cross”. I never saw that before. The watch comes with a brown strap.

Rolex's 'name' was 'defined' by the Oyster (1926) and the 'Perpetual' in 1934/5, and all their early advertising talks about the advantages of the complete 360-degree rotor. Rolex pioneered the system of rotor self-winding, as with most Rolex inventions, it was brilliantly simple device and one that 'made' history. The simplicity of Rolex design was awarded with Swiss Patent on May 16th, 1933, and was launched in 1934. It was for certain, a better arrangement than the bumper systems that had been introduced by Harwood.

Yet there exist some 'solitary' fully signed Oyster case watches, and the 'Harwood' style bumper movement.

So why does this ultra early stainless steel 1946(?) Tudor Oyster has a bumper movement? Rolex didn't need to use bumpers, so why did it ever think of doing so?

James Dowling discusses the same model on page 337 in the last section "Weird Stuff Happens" chapter of his book. It is clear that the Tudor Oyster he pictures is the only one he's aware of. In twenty-five years of daily involvement in vintage watches, I have NEVER seen or heard of another, except for the Dowling piece. Notice that Mr. Dowling's watch and this one both have the same 951-model reference.

I was told that they had a third number stamped beneath their model reference. He believed that this was their number within a small batch of either 50 or 100 prototypes. I have no idea whether this is true or not, but can say that this watch has "46" stamped on its case back below the model reference, which is a format I've not seen before on any Rolex Oyster. On the other hand, it was manufactured in either late 1945 or early 1946, so this might be a date stamp. Who knows? I'm guessing that the date stamp theory is correct. Against this, why should Rolex choose to only date stamp this model in this way, and not do the same for any other watch in their range at the same time? So many questions and no real answers!

History

The Tudor name was registered in 1906 by a Swiss watchmaker named Isaac Blumenthal in memory of the famous Royal English family who reign from 1495 to 1603. In 1940, Mr. Wilsdorf founder and owner of Rolex trade the name “The Tudor”. Since, the Rolex of the street guy developed beautiful watches such as the “Hydronaut” or la “Princess Date Chronograph” with the particularity to have ETA movement, one of the ever made.

Technical details

Tudor Oyster Automatic with Bumper Movement.

Measurements

Diameter excluding winding crown: 34mm
Length including lugs: 42mm

Price: $2,975